Sector Profile

 

Human Resource

Population

According to 2001 census the total population of District is 1107037, 1.967% of the total population of State. The decennial growth of population was 28.07during 1981-91 which has come down slightly during 1991-2001 i.e. 26.58%. the density of population of district as per 2001 census is 294 Per Sq.Km. while the sex ratio is 1027. the urban population of district is only 80143 while rural population is 1026894.

Year/ Area 

Area in Sq. Km

Population

Density Per Sq. Km 

Female Per 1000 Male

Male 

Female

Total 

 

1971

 

Rural 

 

3749-40

 

 

246931

 

 

252070

 

 

499001

 

 

133

 

 

1021

 

Urban

 

20-60

 

 

16185

 

 

15072

 

 

31217

 

 

1522

 

 

931

 

Total

 

3770-00

 

 

263116

 

 

267142

 

 

530258

 

 

141

 

 

1015

 

 

1981

 

Rural

 

3752-80

 

 

310724

 

 

327995

 

 

638719

 

 

168

 

 

1056

 

Urban

 

17-20

 

 

23227

 

 

20899

 

 

44126

 

 

2560

 

 

900

 

Total

 

3770-00

 

 

333951

 

 

348894

 

 

682845

 

 

181

 

 

1045

 

 

1991

 

Rural

 

3742-73

 

 

404688

 

 

406044

 

 

810732

 

 

217

 

 

1003

 

Urban

 

27-27

 

 

33636

 

 

30181

 

 

63817

 

 

234

 

 

897

 

Total 

 

3855-00

 

 

438324

 

 

436225

 

 

874549

 

 

232

 

 

995

 

2001

Rural 

3742.73

504671

522223

1026894

274

1034

Urban 27.27 41425 38718 80143 2938 934

Total 

3770

546096

560941

1107037

294

1027

2011

Total 

3770

696532

692020

1388552

-

994


Social Composition The predominance of tribal people is a conspicuous tariff of the district. The percentage of ST population as per 1991 census is 65.84 while percentage of SC is 4.61. The percentage of general caste is very low but they are economically dominant, who control more fertile agriculture land & control over trade and commerce. Literacy The literacy rate of district was 30.55 as per 1991 census which is now 48.32 as per 2001 census. The male literacy was 45.71 in 1991 which is now 66.19 while female literacy was 15.40 during 1991 which has increased to 31.22 as per 2001 census. Settlement Pattern Most of the district is taken up by hilly and undulating terrain inhabitant by Bhils who live in widely dispersed villages. The population of one village reside in the radius of 5 to 8 kms on hill sides or isolated hillocks. The cluster villages are only few in the low lying areas where level ground plain can be found. Occupational Structure As per 2001 census the percentage of working marginal and non working population is 24.63, 23.75 and 51.62 respectively. The main occupation of working population is agriculture 59.28 % and economy of district is more dominated on subsistence agriculture.

Natural Resource

All historical evidence to confirm that landscape in Dungarpur has dramatically changed our last 4-5 decades. The disappearance of forest and increase of unproductive land by the way of Soil erosion has worried. The situation has changed completely with the population growth, pressure on land, our night commercial exploitation of forest and step agriculture on hillock side. All this resulted in neclead hills. In the year when the weather conditions are not favourable large segment of the rural population live under famine like condition and must be helped out by the Government. The present situation of natural resources is as below:

Land

The total geographical area of District is 385592 hects as per land records. out of which 186784 hects is cultivable and 134786 hect. is uncultivable. The land use figures of last 4-5 decades reflects no significant changes in the land use pattern. District has less agricultural land, less net area sown, less cultivable wastelands, on the other hand there is more pasture land and grazing land. During 2001-2002 the gross cultivated area was 150904 hect. while net area sown was 121005 hect. and 61241 hect. was forest land. The percentage of area sown against total geographical area was 31.38 while percentage of net irrigated area to net area sown was 14.15% only.

Agriculture is based on rain fed and people are cultivating crops on hillocks by step agriculture which is resulting in soil erosion rapidly. Fertile land of district is eroded and district is heavily geared to subsistence agriculture. The situation of agriculture as per 1995-96 agriculture census is as below.

(i) Size of fields are very small. The numbers of fields were 139242 with total cultivated area of 190824.84 hect. which gives an average of 1.36 hect.

(ii) The per capita net area sown is only 0.14 hect and per capita land holding is 0.44 hect.

The primary crops are maize, rice and wheat use of improved high yields seeds, use of fertilizers and mechanization in agriculture is very low. The per hect. production is very low 700 to 1000 kgs. only. Table showing land use pattern during last 5 years is as under:

Particulars

 

96-97

 

 

97-98

 

 

98-99

 

99-2000

2000-01 2001-02
Total Geogragraphical Area

385593

385593

385593

385593 385593 385593
Forest

60691

61126

61126

61241 59442 61241
Non Agriculture use land 

22826

22826

22826

22829 22829 22819
Salti and non cultivable 

77471

77308

77308

77289 77279 100658
Current fallow   9088    9078     70261 43421 48455 12379
Cultivable Waste Land

23470

23701

25184

24215 24569 24324
Permanent Pasture

34777

34777

34777

34678 34678 34678
Miscellaneous Trees & Crops

2424

2674

2518

2772 2276 2276
Net Area Sown

124758

125329

116777

119148 15072 121005
Gross Sown Area

185073

186200

180219

153406 128261 150904
Area Sown more than once

60315

60871

63442

34258 13189 29899
Gross Irrigated Area

35428

36453

36344

24072 13230 27020
Irrigated Area

31773

33108

32940

21654 12243 24914

Agriculture

The agriculture is main occupation of people of district on which more than 80% people earn their livelihood. Most of the area of district is hilly & sloppy. The net area sown to total geographical area is about 33%.

Cultivable land classified in the land use table, in true sense cannot be considered as cultivable land as such net area sown is low significantly in compare to cultivable land. Agriculture is based on Rain fed & people are cultivating crops on hillocks by step agriculture which is further resulting in erosion of soil. Fertile soil of district is eroded & district is heavily geared to subsistence agriculture. Size of holding is very small. As per 1997 agriculture census the numbers of fields were 139242 with a total cultivated area of 190825 Hactors which gives an average of 1.37 hactors. The per capita net area sown is 0.14 hactors. & per capita land holding is only 0.44 hactors.

Primary crops are maize, rice, jawar, wheat & small grains, secondary crops are various lentils & oil seeds. There is lack of irrigation facilities also in the district. The percentage of gross irrigated area to gross sown area is only 16% poor natural conditions, poor irrigation poor technology, very low use of improved seeds & fertilizers & poor organization of agriculture activities combine to produce low intensity of crop land use. The year wise area under different crops, production, use of fertilizers are as under.

 

                                                                                                (Area's Units in Hactors)

 

Particulars

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-2001

2001-02 2002-03
Wheat 38185 21620 9887 23543 9536
Jawar 1067 974 278 532  409
Gram 21874 12532 1927 4770 2437
Maize 62226 63161 69925 68678 75291
Rice 17197 21366 15144 20576 8439

                                                                                                Primary Crops (in M.T.)

 

Particulars

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-2001

2001-2002

2002-03

Wheat 64914 36754 14776 36690 16124
Jawar 1536 1367 342 962 629
Gram 30627 17545 2286 6318 3300
Maize 18610 23801 19812 30210 2050
Rice 2073 2852 535 3740 279

                                                                                                    Production per Hactor (In kg.)

 

Particulars

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-2001

2001-02 2002-03
Wheat 1699 1700 1496 1685 1690
Jawar 1402 1403 1230 1522 1537
Gram 1400 1400 1186 1324 1354
Maize 299 376 283 439 272
Rice 120 133 35 18 33

Animals

Live stock rearing plays very important role in the peasant economy of Dungarpur. According to 1997 cattle censes the District has 401059 cows and bulls, 176584 female and male buffaloes, 146304 sheeps, 296592 goats with the total cattle population 1312092 which is higher than human population. The cattle of area are of the short stature malvi bread where as buffaloes and goats are of non descript Deshi breed. About 80% of the cattles are considered unproductive and return from this sector is very low. There is need to take up numbers of activities related to upgrading cattle population as over all productivity very low and very little work has been done in this direction. There are 35 Hospitals, 13 dispensaries and 131 artificial insemination centres, 12 sub centres village plan and 71 integrated cattle development sub centres in the district. The details is as under :-

Institute

No. (2000)

No. (2001)

No.(2002) No.(2003)
Veterinary Hospital  

35

35

35 35
Veterinary Dispensary

13

13

13 13
Sub Centre village base plan

13

13

13 13
Rog Nidan Kendra 

1

1

1 1
Pashu Vikas Yojna Upkendra

-

71

83 83
Artificial Insemination Centres

131

131

131 131

Forest

Forests of the district are controlled and regulated by the Forest Department which has a State trading wing too for proper felling of trees and trade in timber. Now State Tribal Area Development Corporation has been entrusted with the purchase and regulation of minor forest produce i.e. gum. puwar, karang, dhaturi, safed musli, honey, bichhukanta, mahuwa, anwala, bahera, ratanjot etc. Mahuwa and Mango trees are plentiful. The forests have largely disappeared from the plains due to unabatted felling of trees. Only mahuwa trees are found in the agricultural fields. Almost pure khankra (Buteo monosperma) associated with Kanjeri (Holoptelia integrigolia), Kadam (Mitragoina Parivifolia), gurar ( Albizia procers) are found along the 'nullah' and in villages, but in 'nullahs' having rocky boulders, arjun (Terminalia arujna) is found.

Forestry & Forest produce provide livelihood to a sizable population of the district. The following extract from the Famine Report of 1899-1900 still illustrates the typical and significant role of forestry for the tribal population of the district.

"A very large portion of the district consists of undulating hills and densely wooded valley which afford a wonderful variety of edible products on which the Bhil population can and do to a large extent subsist.

" The Mahuwa tree is very dear and precious to Bhils' heart. Other trees of commercial value are teak, haldu, temru, khair, shisham and babul. Fire-wood and charcoal are also forest products of economic value.

The Mahuwa flowers are used as food and for manufacturing spirit. The main forest products are bamboos, anwla, gum and spirits, grass and pasture, kattha, tendu leaves etc.

As regards flora, mention may be made of mahuwa (Madhuka indica), teak, dhookra (Anogeissus pendula) trees. Other species of trees such as neem, piple (Ficus religiosa), bablu (Acacia arabica) are found in plentiful. The bearing trees found in the district are mango, imli (tamarindus indica) ber (Zizyphus jujuba), jamun, temru, bahera and khajur. Different types of grasses are found in the district.

As regards fuana, despite merciless felling of trees and forest, pathers, hyaenas and sambar (Cervus unicolor) can be sighted. Nilgais (Boselaphus tragocamelus) have been gradually exterminated by the Bhils. Amoung the non-game animals, the jackal the jungle rat, the Indian fox, the hyaena, the porcupine, the common mongoose are also observed. Amoung the birds commonly found include partiridges (Grey and painted), pea-fowis, rock pigeons, green pigeons, quails, cuckoos, parrots, eagles, vultures, crows, etc.

Major carps, cat-fish and other varieties of fish are available in Mahi and Som rivers as well as in Bamaniya, Akhepur, Ghamri Deval, Baba ki bar and Lodeshwar tanks. Among the major carps which may be mentioned are rohu (La-beo-rohita), Khurisi or sarsi (Labes gonius), Kalbose or kalot (lapes calbasu), narain (Cirrhina mrigla), katla (Catla catla), mahashwar (Barbas putifora) while the cat-fish variety includes patola (Notoplerus notopterus), girai (Oohiscephelus stritus) saul (Ophiocepha vis marulius), Landu (Wallagonia attu) etc.

Forest are still of great important to the people of Dungarpur District for fuel wood, grazing fodder, some small timber and minor forest produce.

At present percentage of forest area is 17.84% to total geographical area of District. As per satellite survey, forest area during the last decade has increased 550 hect. and at present forest area is 693-31 sq. km. During 2001-2002 fodder worth 33974 quintal was collected from forest and revenue income from Tendu patta was Rs. 40.89 lacs.

Year

Income from

Tendu Patta 

Other

Income

1989-1990

26.58

6.42

1990-1991

53.84

8.01

1991-1992

69.06

12.04

1992-1993

57.79

15.08

1993-1994

11.41

9.38

1994-1995

29.09

10.74

1995-1996

22.09

16.40

1996-1997

32.26

18.94

1997-1998

20.03

14.31

1998-1999

21.55

12.04

1999-2000

37.59

10.39

2000-2001

40.89

12.48


Water Resources

There is three perennial rivers in the district. Ralom, Som and Magam. There is one medium irrigation project, 51 irrigation tanks and 900 village tanks to store rain water. In the district about 12870 MCFT water can be stored out of which at present 3846 mcft water is being stored in the irrigation tanks and 6102 mfct in the Som Kamla Amba Dam.

The gross irrigated area of District during 2000-01 was 27020 hecters while net irrigated area was 24914 hect. Some detail about Som Kamla Amba Dam is as under :-

Complete  1728 Lacs  Ghanmeter
(6102 MCFT)
Useful  1603 Lacs Ghanmeter
(5661 MCFT)
Irrigation Potential 80 % above
Maximum Height of Chief Dam 620 Meter 
Maximum Height of Dam 34.50 Meter
Flood Disposal capacity 20500 Ghanmeter  Per second
Length of Dam 2420 Meter
Water Storage Area 3618 Hect.
Iron Gate 13 No.
Expected Life of Dam 100 Years

Table showing year wise irrigated area by different sources is as below:

 

                                                                                                                     (Area in Hactors)

 

Year

Well

Tanks

Canal

Other resource

Irrigated area

1991-92

16109

7037

911

3022

27079

1992-93

16073

7659

1426

3400

28558

1993-94

17296

7841

1926

4052

31115

1994-95

17793

7840

1981

3906

31520

1995-96

17044

5490

3037

4250

29721

1996-97

20413

6817

4164

4034

35428

1997-98

22086

6298

4752

3317

36453

1998-99

21620

5444

5447

3833

36344

1999-2000

14236

1603

5684

2549

24072

2000-01 7618 478 3564 1570 13230
2001-02 13766 2744 8521 2479 27520

Minerals

Contribution of minerals is also significant upto some extent in the economy of District. The main minerals of district are soapstone, floride, serpentine, marble slab, granite and masonry stone. The production of soapstone was 91.16M.T., Fluoride 156 MT, masonry stone 14984 mt and serpentine 13203 mt during 2001-2002. There is need to establish processing unit in the district related to mineral and Agro-Forestry based industries.

Name of Minerals

Unit

Year wise Production

97-98

98-99

99-2000

2000-2001

2001-02
Primary Minerals   
1- Soapstone 000 MT 38.150 98.98 102.77 96.17 91.16
2- Floride 000 MT 0.19 0.49 - 0.75 0.15
Secondary Minerals  
1-Masonry   Stone 000 MT 74.996 80.51 64.00 94.00 149.84
2-Serpentine 000 MT 27.75 120.41 146.06 119.75 132.03

Infrastructure

Education

There are 3 Colleges, 2 Sanskrit Colleges and one Teacher Training College, 129 Secondary/Senior Secondary Schools, 389 Middle schools, 968 Primary Schools, 1035 Rajeev Gandhi Pathshala and two ITIs and one Teacher Training School in the district and thus there are 87 Primary Schools, 33 Middle Schools and 11 Secondary/Senior Secondary for One lac population.

Medical & Health

There are two Hospitals, 7 Community Health Centre, 42 Primary Health Centre and 302 Sub Centres in the District and thus there are four Primary Health Centres and 27 Sub Centres for one lac population.

Electricity

There is eighteen 33/11 K.V. stations in the district. The number of Electrified villages are 850 out of total populated villages 866 of district. The number of electrified ST busties is 61 out of total 64 ST busties of district. The number of electrified wells in the district is 3674. The number of consumer of electricity is 75220.

Roads

There is 1371.56 Km B.T. road, 58.90 Km Gravel road, 125.15 km metal road and 78.60km Kachhi road in the district. The number of villages connected with the road is 565.

Post and Telegraph

The number of Post offices are 302, Telegram Offices 2, and Letter Boxes are 612 in the district.

Industries

There are two big industries in the district with total investment of Rs. 86 crores and more than 4000 people are employed. The number of Registered industries is 2600 with the total capital investment of Rs. 1548.31 lacs and employment 7892. The number of registered factories in the district is 47.

Banks

There are 41 commercial banks, 21 RRBs, 11 CCB and PLDBs, and thus the total number of Bank branches are 73. In addition to this there are 294 co-operative societies in the district.

Drinking Water

The sources of Drinking water for urban area Dungarpur are Adverdsamand, Vijaya Sagar, Demia Dam, 7 Tube wells, 19 Open wells and 245 hand pumps. In Sagwara there are 4 Open wells, 8 Tube wells and hand pumps are 162.

In rural area there is piped scheme in 41 villages, Regional water supply scheme in 60 villages, pump and tank scheme in 13 villages, TSS scheme in 11 villages and hand pump schemes in remaining 721 villages. The numbers of hand pumps in rural area as on March, 2003 is 10328 out of which 1664 were dry and 269 were abundant.

Thus the picture immerged from the above facts the situation of district is as below in neet sale.

1- High percentage of ST population, high population growth and low literacy rate.

2- High percentage of dependency on land, small holding and subsistence agriculture.

3- Decline in forest.

4- Excessive soil erosion due to rapid run off.

5- Inadequate utilization of surface water and storage of rain water.

6- Rain fed agriculture and lack of irrigation facilities.

7- Unproductive cattle population.

8- Lack of processing units of mineral based product, Agro forestry and house hold industries.

9- Lack of entrepreneurship.

10- Scattered population and undulating area.

11- Shortage of technical institute and technical personals.

12- High percentage of BPL families.